Current research

Our research is highly diverse and includes topics ranging from embryogenesis, cell reprogramming and organogenesis to aging and stem cell engineering.

Our ongoing and future work will focus on new and emerging areas of developmental biology, such as epigenetics and genomics.

 

Model systems

We house one of the largest zebrafish facilities in the world. Along with zebrafish (D. rerio), we study several other model systems, including the fruit fly (D. melanogaster)nematode (C. elegansand mouse (M. musculus), as well as tissue culture systems and embryonic stem cells.

Upcoming events

23
Oct

David Zhang

October 23, 2019
12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Needleman Library

View all events

 

 

Latest news

Dr. Mokalled has received a grant award from The NIH/NINDS

Dr. Mokalled has received a grant award from The NIH/NINDS

Mayssa Mokalled, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology, has received a five-year, $1,936,562 grant award from The NIH/NINDS starting 9/30/2019 for her project entitled “Mechanisms of glial bridging and neurogenesis during spinal cord regeneration in zebrafish”
Dr. Thor Theunissen has received New Innovator Award from the NIH

Dr. Thor Theunissen has received New Innovator Award from the NIH

Dr. Thorold Theunissen, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology has received a five-year $2,361,375 New Innovator Award from the National Institutes of Health, National Institute of General Medical Sciences beginning September 30, 2019 for his project entitled “Resolving epigenetic instability during pluripotent state transitions: a roadmap for exploiting the biomedical potential of dynamic human stem […]
Dr. Kristen L. Kroll has received a one-year subaward

Dr. Kristen L. Kroll has received a one-year subaward

Congratulations to Dr. Kristen Kroll! Dr. Kristen L. Kroll, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Developmental Biology has received a one-year $150,000 subaward through Harvard Medical School, Undiagnosed Disease Network beginning July 1, 2019 for her project entitled “Using human pluripotent stem cell models to evaluate pathogenicity and define disease mechanisms for ZNF292 variant found in UDN373964”.